Blog

Cal Morrison

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week Cal Morrison shares his experience training as an Assistant Pastor at Calderwood Baptist Church in East Kilbride.


Cal MorrisonWhat led you into training for gospel ministry?
I had always been interested in learning and teaching the Bible, particularly in a Word Ministry. In 2016 the church I am part of were looking to train somebody, and I had been considered. I thought and prayed about it, and it happened that at the same time a completely opposite opportunity arose in my father-in-law’s business. After looking at past experience in life, work and ministry, past desires, affirmations of others, and my own conscience, it became clearer in my mind what I thought God had been preparing me for and what I desired to do.

After 2 years of Bible training in CTC [Cornhill Training Course] I was asking similar questions again in respect to PTC [Pastors’ Training Course]. One of the things that was difficult with CTC was getting funding, I had always been on the backfoot, and it always seemed to be a challenge of faith. This then became a factor for PTC – Would it be the same struggle to get funding? Does that indicate I shouldn’t do this? I had many doubts and fears again. But eventually I came to conclude that this was figured out and clear 2 years previous. If this was the right trajectory then, I should trust God and press on.

 

What does training look like day to day?

The various ministries I lead or am involved in are:

Youth Ministry – Bible Class is on Sunday mornings during the service. I generally oversee this, and one of our leaders plans the program and organises the team. Youth Fellowship is on Sunday Evenings. I organise the team for this, prepare the programs and studies, we create dramas and songs, and visit other people too. In all of this, I will be discipling young people, but also training leaders to disciple young people.

I have been working with other youth coordinators locally to start partnering in the gospel, both the leaders and our youth. And something we are working on also is getting all the youth coordinators together in the region, in the gospel partnership we belong to, and planning bigger youth events or conferences.

Prison Ministry – We visit HMP Addiewell twice a month taking their Sunday service. I plan the preaching program for this and preach on a monthly basis.

Preaching – Part of my role as an Assistant Pastor is to preach and lead services on a regular basis. We partner with other churches, so often I will be preaching and leading services 2 or 3 times per month, whether morning and evening services at our church or others. There has been quite a lot of opportunity to preach and also to lead the services, and as such I spend time during the week preparing for these.

Discipleship Explored – I currently co-lead a Discipleship Explored group studying Philippians and leading group discussions and prayer on this.

Children’s Ministry – On Thursday nights I join a team in our children’s ministry for primary school aged children. I am just part of the team, so will be on different duties each week, whether preparing food, facilitating games or presenting the teaching.

Web and Publicity – We try to have an active online presence, regularly updating sermons and content, both on social media and our website. I have always had an interest also in media and design, so I do most of the graphics, media and publicity, whether for online pages and content, or for posters and publicity for events or ministries we do.

 

What have you learned over the course of your training? What have been the highlights?
That ministry is hard, unpredictable, tiring, often unmeasurable, stressful, yet full of pleasant surprises, joyful moments with so many gospel opportunities. I have been learning that many people have various expectations, and I myself often have expectations, but in the end I learn that I often cannot see what God is doing in people’s lives, it is hard to measure and track, and easy to get discouraged. But then often there are surprising moments of encouragement, whether it’s what someone says or does, seeing others built up in faith and speak about Jesus. Having people encourage me and build me up. Seeing people become united in heart and mind and purpose. Having the opportunity to study, learn, teach and preach the Bible is one of the greatest privileges and highlights of ministry, to show people from the word of God how amazing the gospel is and how great Jesus is! I love having the opportunity to work with other leaders too, being in a position to develop them as leaders and in their own faith, and to work with young people alongside others.

My training in Cornhill has been invaluable in terms of teaching and preaching the Bible, whether in studies or sermons and such, but one of the biggest learning curves having the opportunity to be so involved in the local church is how to apply that pastorally, seeing the very wide range of people and situations the word of God is speaking to. This has been really helpful, and seeing other teachers, preachers, pastors do so, whether from the pulpit or in personal interactions, has been very beneficial.

 

What role has the Bonar Trust played in your training?
The support of the Bonar Trust has enabled me to go into full-time ministry as an assistant pastor of a church and training in PTC. This support has enabled me to be trained both in the local church for gospel ministry in the thick of church life, and also in Cornhill having the support of a network of training ministers with a pattern of theological and practical training to help not only ourselves develop in gospel ministry but to multiply in gospel ministry, training and developing others.

Without the support of the Bonar Trust, particularly as a 30-something husband and father of two young children, I would not be able to do gospel ministry full-time and be trained to do such. I likely wouldn’t have as much of a capacity or ability to multiply, giving the time to develop others for gospel ministry, as I myself would have limited time and a lack of support and training.

I definitely appreciate not only the personal support from the Bonar Trust, but that there are people, like the Bonar Trust, who are dedicated to enabling others to be trained and prepared for gospel ministry. As such, I think of Paul’s comments in Philippians in respect to those who would partner in the gospel, and to defend and advance the gospel. This is what the Bonar Trust are doing, and I am thankful for the opportunity and privilege to be a part of that.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Cal, you can find all the information here.

Caelan Barnes

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from Caelan Barnes, a second-year ministry apprentice at St Andrews Free Church in St Andrews, Fife.

 

Caelan BarnesWhat did you do before your apprenticeship?
I studied Pure Mathematics at the University of St Andrews.

 

What are you learning at Cornhill?
In general we’re learning how to handle scripture that we might effectively teach it to other people. Recently we’ve been looking at Old Testament narratives, Revelation, and John’s Gospel, as well as the more systematic topics of union with Christ and aspects of pastoral ministry.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
Most of my work revolves around three things: administrative tasks, preparatory work for teaching engagements, and then enacting that work in the teaching of scripture to others. On the administrative front I organise our monthly student lunches as well as maintain the church’s website, make service sheets, and any other tasks that the top brass assign me. As for the teaching situations that I’m preparing for, they include preaching, Sunday school, student Bible studies, and 1-to-1 discipleship. All in all it’s a rather mixed bag! 

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
It’s difficult to isolate one thing because as I’ve learned: ministry is rather varied. I think the biggest thing I’ve grown in though is my ability to teach biblical truths in various contexts. Be it in the pulpit, Sunday school, student Bible studies or 1-to-1 discipleship situations I have grown much in my ability to helpfully and clearly guide others to the truth.

There’s two things I enjoy particularly though. First, studying God’s word, particularly the initial stages of understanding the passage and then nuancing and sharpening my application later on in the preparation process. Second, helping others to see for themselves how the Bible shapes their lives. Often individuals can be struggling with a certain issue that’s only symptomatic of something deeper that they don’t realise. Helping them to see this for themselves by asking good questions and then guiding them to the application of scripture to that situation is very rewarding. It also helps me grow in my godliness as I frequently unearth subterranean issues in myself while I’m helping people unearth theirs!

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
I am mentored by Hamish Sneddon. As he’s mentored me I’ve been learning perseverance in the strength that Christ gives us as we carry out the work of his gospel. I’ve found my time as a ministry trainee difficult and constantly returning to why we do it and who’s power we do it in has been a recurring theme in our supervision meetings.

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
At this juncture in my life I don’t think further formal ministry is the immediate next step. That’s not to say I’ll never do it, I just don’t think now is the right time. Instead my current plan is to return to studying in St Andrews, transitioning into philosophy, whilst continuing to serve in as large a capacity as they’ll allow me at St Andrews Free Church.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Caelan, you can find all the information here.

Kirsty Scott

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from Kirsty Scott, a first-year ministry apprentice at Hawick Baptist Church in the Scottish Borders.

Kirsty ScottWhat did you do before your apprenticeship?
For the past 4 years I have been working as a primary school teacher in the Scottish Borders.

 

What are you learning at Cornhill?
So far we have been working through a series of Bible Overview lectures tracking God’s incredible salvation plan. Within our smaller teaching groups I have had the opportunity to prepare and deliver some talks expounding Bible passages. My favourite part so far has been an in-depth study of the book of Exodus.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
This term my day-to-day ministry opportunities are wrapped up in learning, planning, and preparations. My current priority is that I will be able to build relationships with a new core of young people in Hawick. I have also scheduled in meetings over the next few weeks to build relationships with gospel-minded Christians in the town who are already working in schools to see how I can support this work. I organised events in the lead up to Christmas, for example, a Christmas Craft Afternoon in order to invite people of all ages to our Christmas services and a Christmas Party for young people as a promo for what will be happening in Youth Group in 2020. I am  developing a teaching plan for children and youth that we can run with in 2020 and part of this preparation involves delivering some training for our Sunday school leaders.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
Making myself available for gospel opportunities! I have been praying for opportunities to meet young people. I was recently at a Christians in Sport training and equipping night and as a result I met a lady who is involved with a junior running club and so hopefully I will be able to have an opportunity there to use my love of running to go and help with this running club and meet young people in the town.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
Martin Smith (Lead Pastor, Hawick Baptist Church) and Agnes Brough (Cornhill Scotland) mentor me. We have a focus on three big principles: character, competence and convictions. The apprenticeship is an opportunity for me to grow in all three areas and to help me on my way we have identified some helpful reading material for me to work through and provide feedback on during my supervisions. This term I am reading a book called Christian Youth Work by Mark Ashton and Phil Moon to help me as I seek to develop a gospel centred foundation for our youth ministry.

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I hope that there will be an opportunity for me to continue to work for or at least continue to serve the local church in whatever capacity is needed.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Kirsty, you can find all the information here.

 

 

 

New Publicity

The Bonar Trust has recently updated all its publicity. As Trustees we hope this will give you greater clarity about the vision and ongoing work of the Trust.

We now have a General Overview booklet available that covers the various aspects of the Trust’s work.

We have also updated our Profiles booklet, introducing you to some of the individuals the Trust has funded in the past, some we are currently funding, and some of the partner churches and training institutions we work with.

Additionally, we have updated our giving information. You can now download the new Giving to the Trust booklet with all the different ways you can donate to the Trust. We also have a new document for those who are interested in leaving a legacy for the Trust.

Jonny Gilmour

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week Jonny Gilmour tells us about his experience as a second-year Minister in Training at Chalmers Church Edinburgh.

Jonny Gilmour

What led you into training for gospel ministry?
I became a Christian when I was quite young and was very fortunate to be around a gospel teaching church throughout my youth, as well as having Christian parents who told me about Jesus from a very young age. When I went to university, I began to teach and preach the Bible and found that I had an aptitude and a real love for doing so. I was encouraged by the (hugely supportive) elders of the church I attended as a student to carry out some further training, so I completed the Cornhill training course in Glasgow whilst working as a youth worker for that church. 

During that year, my convictions about the importance of the good news of Jesus, the importance of his word being taught clearly, and my love for his people grew. I therefore felt drawn towards vocational gospel ministry in the future, but thought that I would benefit from a few years of working in a different environment first. I trained as a litigation solicitor and worked in law for a few years, all whilst continuing to teach the Bible and becoming an elder in my local church, Chalmers. The opportunity to pursue further vocational ministry training then arose in Chalmers, and it felt as though it was the right time and definitely the right place to begin further training, with a view to moving into vocational gospel ministry.

 

What training had you done prior to your current role, if any?
Prior to commencing my current role, I had completed the Cornhill course in Glasgow and worked for another church as a youth worker for a year. I was then a non-vocational elder with Chalmers for 3 years before beginning full time training in the summer of 2018.

 

What does training look like day to day?
My Minister in Training role is an example of partnership training, which means that my training input comes both from a local church, in my case Chalmers, and from an external training provider, in my case Edinburgh Theological Seminary (ETS). Locating training in a local church was important for me. The primary reason for that is that that’s where training is located in the New Testament. Local churches have a responsibility for identifying and discipling elders and leaders for the future, whether those leaders are vocational or not, and the partnership training model means that at least part of ministry training input comes from a local church.

For me, a significant part of that has involved teaching the Bible regularly and receiving feedback on that teaching. It has also included regular training seminars in practical ministry and Bible handling from more senior ministry staff. Perhaps the most important aspect of locating training in a local church doesn’t actually relate to competencies, however. Giftedness to teach the Bible is a key qualification for any church leader, and a key part of my training is in how to teach the Bible better. Other key qualifications for any church leader are a love for the Lord Jesus and godliness, so locating training in a local church family means that training is part of a bigger picture of discipleship and accountability.

In addition to training with a local church, I also have training from an external training provider in ETS. At ETS, we are able to spend time on elements of training that a local church like Chalmers just can’t realistically cover, like learning biblical languages. ETS provide all of that input in a really robust way and, wonderfully, the teaching comes from lecturers who love the Lord Jesus, love his word, and love his church.

Those two elements of training input – ETS and Chalmers – are physically separate, but each aspect bleeds into the other. What I learn at ETS is therefore shaping the way I approach what I do with Chalmers, not least how I preach and teach the Bible, and what I see in church life in Chalmers makes me reflect differently on what I’m studying at ETS. They are a really good complement to one another.

 

What have you learned over the course of your training? What have been the highlights?
I have learned a huge amount over the course of my training so far. The biggest learning point has not been new, however, but has been a deepening conviction in something I was already conscious of: that God is a speaking God, and that his word is powerful. The highlight of my training so far has therefore been personally witnessing the impact of God’s word on people’s lives. Seeing Christians growing in their faith as they study the Bible, particularly with other Christians, and witnessing people who aren’t yet Christians really engaging with Jesus in the pages of the Bible, is a genuine privilege.

 

What do you hope to do when you’ve finished training? What stage are you at with these plans?
When I finish training, I hope to lead a local church somewhere in Scotland as a Minister/Pastor. My sense is that I am more likely to lead an already existing church rather than planting a new one, as many of my peers have done. I have been wrong many times before though, and I’d very happily be proven wrong again!

 

What role has the Bonar Trust played in your training?
The Bonar Trust has already played a significant role in my training. The trustees organise conferences, where groups of people involved in training roles in churches gather from across Scotland to study the Bible together, to teach it to each other and receive constructive feedback from more experienced Bible teachers. This is tremendously helpful, not only in sharpening each others’ teaching and preaching, but also in growing a network of likeminded church leaders across the country.

Additionally, I receive financial support from the Trust. I have a young family, so taking a step out of a secure job in law and into training for vocational ministry on a part time church salary was not without risk. Without the financial support of the Bonar Trust, there is no way I would have been able to do what I am doing, so I am very thankful for the work of the trust, and for those who contribute that work.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Jonny, you can find all the information here.

 

James Amour

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. Today’s post introduces James Amour, who is a first-year ministry apprentice at Charlotte Baptist Chapel in Edinburgh.

 

James Amour

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
I worked in a marketing agency as a digital designer. 

 

What are you learning on your study programme at Cornhill?
I’m learning that my body doesn’t like early starts as well as how to study the Bible, how to interpret passages truthfully, and how to faithfully and effectively convey these truths to others. 

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
My days are very varied but an average day would consist of some reading and studying in the morning. Then, in the afternoon I might have a meeting or study with someone. In the evening I might have a ministry to attend such as the student ministry or home group study. 

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
The most important thing I’m learning is what goes on in a church behind the scenes. It’s quite humbling to see the paid staff as well as church members so committed to their roles and tasks. Everyone is working hard and diligently to see the people of Edinburgh come to Christ. It’s inspired me to be a red-hot church member wherever I end up in the future. 

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
My mentor is Liam Garvie. Meeting with Liam on a weekly basis is undoubtedly the highlight of the week. He teaches us how to read and study the Bible for ourselves, we review and discuss books, and ask him questions about ministry that might be on our minds. 

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I’m not yet sure if I would like to return to secular work or be involved in paid-ministry. 

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like James, you can find all the information here.

Rowan Corrigan

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. In this week’s post Rowan Corrigan, a first-year ministry apprentice at St Columba’s Free Church in Edinburgh, tells us about her experience as an apprentice so far.

 

Rowan Corrigan

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
Before my apprenticeship, I studied Physics for 4 years at Heriot Watt before spending a year on the Relay programme with UCCF based at Napier University. 

 

What are you learning at Cornhill?
Cornhill is really helping me to be able to listen to God’s voice. I’m really enjoying digging so deeply into the Bible and unpacking its riches. Every week, I feel as though I am blown away by Jesus and His fulfilment of the Old Testament. It’s helping me to love Jesus more. 

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
The highlight of my week is always the teenager groups. It is such a joy to see so many young people excited and being built up to speak and live for Jesus throughout their years at high school. I spend a lot of time during the week meeting with a variety of women from around the congregation and am enjoying continuing to meet with students. 

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
A massive thing that I am learning right now is seeing how much of working in a church is learning to listen to God and to watch Him at work within the congregation. It’s an encouragement to see that all of the work is led by God and not by man. It is such an encouragement to watch the Spirit doing amazing things around the church daily.  

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
I am mentored by a woman at my church who I have been meeting with for the last 4 years. By openly talking about my struggles, I am often reminded and encouraged that we do not face the Christian life alone, and that we all walk together to bring us closer to Jesus. 

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I’m not really sure what my plans will be post-apprenticeship. I’d love to stay in ministry, potentially as a women’s worker for a church.

 

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Rowan, you can find all the information here.

Dan Reisinger

Each week we’re introducing you to people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from Dan Reisinger who is a first-year Pastor-in-Training at Harper Memorial Baptist Church in Glasgow.

Dan ReisingerWhat led you into training for gospel ministry?
Church leaders recognised some raw gifts in teaching the Bible and discipleship and a genuine pursuit of godliness in public and private life, and they offered me a training role. After 3 years as a ministry trainee, I grew in godliness, gifting, a love for God’s son/word and people, and a real desire for pastoral ministry. That and some more church leaders recognising this helped me find a suitable next role.


What training had you done prior to your current role, if any?
I have done 3 years as a ministry trainee in 2 very different locations (Blackpool+Chessington). While there I have done the North West partnership training course and have completed the London Cornhill training course.


What does training look like day to day?
Harper is a great church to be training at, with a great team who are very focused on discipleship and training. There’s lots of opportunities to get stuck in with a wide range of ministry experience, and also times of shadowing Alan, the senior pastor, through some more unique and trickier pastoral situations.

Some ministry opportunities include: preaching+leading Sunday gatherings, leading a mid-week home group Bible study and a mid-week evangelistic/discipleship course, starting up+leading+teaching a weekly young adults work, 1-to-1s, and some involvement with local CU’s.

I also have the privilege of doing the Pastors’ Training Course at Cornhill Scotland, which breaks up into 50% classroom study // 50% home study once a week.


What have you learned over the course of your training? What have been the highlights?
I have learnt/been reminded and challenged afresh about lots even in the short time I have been at Harper. Some of these things include: the reminder that faithful gospel ministry often includes consistently doing the ordinary, often overlooked things to love and serve ordinary people in everyday life; the power of God’s word to transform lives; that our ministry is a creaturely one, we are limited and finite and so we are wholly dependant on God to be at work in and through us, and even often despite us.


What do you hope to do when you’ve finished training?
The desire would be to go into pastoral ministry wherever the Lord calls and brings me.


What role has the Bonar Trust played in your training?
The Bonar Trust has played a pretty vital role in my training already and I hope will continue to, as I would not be able to afford to work full time at Harper Church apart from the generous grant they have given to me for this year.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Dan, you can find all the information here.

Benjamin White

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. In this week’s post Ben White explains his work as a first-year ministry apprentice at Cornerstone Community Church in Stirling.

 

Benjamin White

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
Last year I spent ten months working with UCCF, through the ‘Relay Programme’. Prior to that I studied ‘International Relations and Geography’ at The University of Aberdeen.

 

What are you learning on your study programme?
I spend Monday and Tuesdays studying at Cornhill. It’s split into two aspects; we have lectures where we have been studying Exodus, looking at a Bible overview and how to preach. The other aspect is preaching class, where we give expositions of a given passage ourselves. It has been a real joy to study God’s word in more detail and to have an opportunity to think about how one expounds on God’s word. It’s a really great time!

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
I work alongside Cat Thomas at Cornerstone and together we head up the Student and Youth ministry. That takes up the bulk of our time but I also help with the ‘Mainly Music’ toddlers’ group on a Friday, I attend and sometimes lead my Church Community Group, alongside being involved with many other aspects of the church family. 

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
It is hard to condense what have been a really excellent two months so far. I really love Cornerstone and count it as a blessing to be doing a ministry apprenticeship here. We have been preparing a Bible overview with the youth and it has been great to show them how the Bible fits together and how parts of the Bible that they thought dry and dull are filled with excitement and ultimately point to Jesus. With the students we are looking at what it means to be a Christian; it’s been really encouraging to see them challenged by God’s word and to how they are responding to it. I am learning how to prepare and teach different sorts of biblical literature. The Bible overview has been particularly challenging in trying to distil the key themes of the Bible, but it has been a rewarding process and my own understanding of God’s word is growing.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
I am mentored by our Pastor Calum Jack. I really enjoy our time together every Wednesday, but it can often be challenging reflecting on where I am not honouring God with my life. I have always struggled with perfectionism and it has been really great learning how to work to God’s expectations not mine. 

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I have a number of different plans that I am pursuing. I know that wherever I end up I want to be proclaiming Jesus’ name in whatever opportunities I have.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Ben, you can find all the information here.

 

Kat Andrews

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week Kat Andrews shares about her experience as a second-year ministry apprentice at Bruntsfield Evangelical Church in Edinburgh.

Kat Andrews

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
Before the trainee programme I worked in museums doing collections care/conservation. Most recently I worked for the National Trust for Scotland in a couple of their Edinburgh properties.

 

What are you learning on your study programme?
I am studying at Cornhill as part of my apprenticeship. I’m learning a range of different things, but one of the things that most stands out is that I’m getting a better grasp of how the whole Bible fits together and how the wider context helps us understand it. I’m also enjoying the opportunity to study some of the more difficult parts of the Bible, for example we recently looked at Revelation. We also discuss some of the practical aspects of what working in ministry is actually like, which is really useful. Getting to spend time with other people who are doing something similar to me is also a great opportunity to share experiences and support each other.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
Day-to-day my ministry at Bruntsfield is quite varied. My main focus is student and youth work, along with some more general women’s ministry. I meet with students to study the Bible one-to-one and help organise and run student lunches. I also do Bible studies with the teenagers during Sunday services. I lead a weekly women’s Bible study and also help with the food bank we run. The rest of my time is spent preparing the Bible studies and my Cornhill assignments.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
I think the most important thing I am learning from the trainee programme is a growing love for God and for teaching his word. One of the greatest joys in the last year or so has been seeing women of all ages grow in their relationship with God as we study the Bible together.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
I meet regularly with Alistair, the assistant pastor at Bruntsfield, to discuss my work and different areas of ministry. I also meet regularly with an older lady in the church and, externally, with the women’s worker from another church.

This, along with spending time working alongside the other members of the staff team, is giving me a growing understanding of what working in ministry is like and is helping me to develop my own gifts.

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I have a growing desire to see teenagers and students particularly, as well as women in general, grow in their relationship with God and develop their gifts whilst serving the church. After the trainee programme I would, God willing, love to work for a church in a women’s/student worker role.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Kat, you can find all the information here.