Drew Kennedy

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we meet Drew Kennedy, a second-year Apprentice at Bruntsfield Evangelical Church in Edinburgh.

Drew Kennedy

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
I was studying full time at Edinburgh Theological Seminary.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
I am involved in a lot of kids and youth work. I help lead a Youth club for primary school kids, a Scripture Union group and our own Sunday youth ministry. When I’m not with the groups and young people I’m writing material and preparing. I also meet a couple of students and study with them on a one-to-one basis which I really enjoy.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
I’m learning a lot theologically and practically. I’m learning more about the theology and the practice of pastoral care, the different ministries I’m involved in and the life of a congregation week to week.

My highlights are seeing the guys I’m in one-to-one’s with grow in their love of the Lord Jesus, and be better equipped in their own Christian lives and better able to share the Gospel.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
I have three official mentors! I meet one-to-one with Alistair Chalmers who is our line manager and main trainer. I have an internal mentor who is a member of our congregation and I have an external mentor, Christiaan Hofstra, the pastor of Bellevue Chapel, which lets me draw on three very different but all equally valuable streams of life and ministry experience.

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I am currently looking at moving into a Youth Work role.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Drew, you can find all the information here.

James Russell

Each week we’re  introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from James Russell, a first year Minister in Training at Charlotte Baptist Chapel in Edinburgh.

James Russell

What led you into training for gospel ministry?
Going into full-time ministry was not something I thought about very much when I was growing up! But while I was working as a worship leader in a church in Belfast God started to work in my heart and gave me a passion for discipleship and preaching, which led me to get some Bible training at Cornhill. It was at Cornhill that I really began to feel called into ministry. As we went through 2 Timothy, I felt a burning desire to ‘preach the word’ and ‘do the work of an evangelist.’ Following Cornhill, I was blessed with opportunities to preach in the local church back home in Northern Ireland and my elders confirmed that I should follow my desire to train for ministry.

 

What does training look like day to day?
At Charlotte Chapel I am responsible for the young adults and students group (YACC). YACC is a great opportunity to disciple young adults and students as they navigate university or as they enter the world of work. We meet weekly to study the Bible and regularly have seminars and outreach events. I also organise the Christianity Explored course which is a great opportunity to introduce the Gospel to people who don’t know Jesus yet. On top of that I am regularly involved with leading services, preaching and I attend elders meetings. 4 mornings a week I am studying at Edinburgh Theological Seminary. 

 

What have you learned over the course of your training? What have been the highlights?
I have learnt a lot! I think the highlight for me has been studying ecclesiology and thinking through what a church should look like – this has been really well-supplemented by being able to chat to pastors and attend elders meetings at Charlotte Chapel. I think my preaching has also benefited from my training so far as I grow in my ability to handle the Bible. 

 

What do you hope to do when you’ve finished training? What stage are you at with these plans?
When I have finished my training, I hope to go into full-time pastoral ministry in some form. Of course, where I go and what role I might have is entirely in God’s hands so I’m currently just trying to develop relationships as I submit to the leadership God has provided for me and remain open to God’s leading for the future. 

 

What role has the Bonar Trust played in your training?
Without the financial support of the Bonar Trust I wouldn’t be able to train full time. I am also really looking forward to taking part in the residential development weekends which I’m sure will have a big impact on my leadership and preaching. 

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like James, you can find all the information here.

Ally Macleod

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week Ally Macleod tells us about his experience as a first-year Apprentice at Chalmers Church Edinburgh.

Ally Macleod

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
Last year I was a Relay worker with UCCF at Heriot-Watt university. I completed my probationer year as a physics teacher before that.

 

What are you learning at Cornhill?
There’s been so much that we’ve covered this term. The chance to prepare and give talks, Gobbets, etc. has shown me how much goes into sermons, etc. Going deeper into Exodus and the Bible as one coherent story with the themes therein has been really illuminating and strengthening for my certainty of the truth of the gospel. The biblical themes module we’ve started has been really enjoyable, especially the theme of creation/new creation and how it’s present throughout the Old and New Testaments.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
I’ve got a good variety of ages, stages and tasks day to day at Chalmers. 

  • I’m involved in our postgraduate and young workers small group network, where I do the admin work for it (weekly email and organisation of the weekend away) and help lead one of the groups itself when we meet to study the Bible together.
  • I coordinate the SU group at James Gillespie’s High School. We meet together and go through various parts of Scripture, this term going right through Mark.
  • On Sunday mornings, I’m part of our Sunday Club team, which caters for 5-11- year olds. The class I am with every week is made up of 9-11 year olds and taking them through Elijah and the Christmas story this term has been a challenge but a joy.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
How much I have to learn and how much we all need to rely on the Lord’s strength in ministry work of any type, full time or not.

The team ethos at Chalmers and the genuine sense of care for us and focus on our relationship with God.

Being given the chance to invest in people and reading the word with them.

Seeing school pupils at the SU group standing firm in their faith, asking and formulating their own answers for important questions.

Seeing God’s hand through all of the situations in which I’ve found myself.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?

Scott Hamilton (Minister in Training at Chalmers) is mentoring me this year. He’s been in my position before, and also mentored me last year when I worked with UCCF so he knows me well. This means mentoring has been really helpful and encouraging in terms of learning from Scott’s past experiences to learn what he feels I’m doing well and what I should be looking to improve. As with the rest of the programme, I’ve learned just how varied and difficult ministry and the day to day of it can be. 

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?

At the moment I am uncertain. I feel like I’ll be doing teaching of some kind, either back in schools while serving at a local church or in further ministry work.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Ally, you can find all the information here.

Phil Pickett

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. Today we hear from Phil Pickett, a Minister in Training at St Andrews Free Church.

Phil Pickett

What led you into training for gospel ministry?
In short, I really love God’s Word and the power of the gospel to change lives. Full time Christian work has been on my heart for most of my life. After leaving Nepal in 2005 where my parents were missionaries I had a growing desire to go back overseas as a missionary. That has since broadened into a desire to serve God in full time ministry wherever he puts me.

What training had you done prior to your current role?
I was a ministry trainee at St. Andrews Free Church for two years while doing the Cornhill training course in Glasgow.

 

What does training look like day to day?
During a normal week, I study at Edinburgh Theological Seminary for two days, I have in-house staff training, train student Bible study leaders, lead Bible studies on Wednesdays and Thursdays, meet up with students 1-to-1, oversee the music at church, and preach roughly once a month.

 

What have you learned over the course of your training? What have been the highlights?
The highlight of the past few years must be the in depth discipleship I receive under Paul and Hamish’s supervision [Minister and Assistant Minister at St Andrews]. By God’s grace, this has been instrumental in helping me to grow in character, maturity, and ministry skills. In a similar vein what I most enjoy about training for ministry is studying God’s word with people and witnessing them grow in Christlikeness.

 

What do you hope to do when you’ve finished training? What stage are you at with these plans?
Right now I don’t know what I’ll be doing past continuing at ETS part time while working for St. Andrews Free Church. I am open to ministry in the UK or abroad, wherever God takes me.

 

What role has the Bonar Trust played in your training?
The Bonar Trust has been vital in funding my study and living costs over the past few years. I have also really appreciated the preaching conferences for the training provided, and the opportunities to build key relationships with those at a similar stage to me of training.

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Phil, you can find all the information here.

James Burnett

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from James Burnett, a first-year apprentice at Christ Church Edinburgh in Craigentinny.

James BurnettWhat did you do before your apprenticeship?
I worked for a charity based in East Lothian called ELCAP where I supported a young adult with additional support needs towards independent living.

 

What are you learning at Cornhill?
At Cornhill I’m learning invaluable Bible handling skills. The main focus of our studies is to be able to understand the Bible as accurately as possible through working out what exactly the author’s purpose was in writing each passage. We are then trained in working out the most helpful and effective way to communicate the truths each passage contains while also appropriately applying those truths to our audience.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
Since starting at the beginning of September I’ve had the privilege of speaking at our lunch club which is a weekly outreach event. I’ve been able to lead our weekly prayer meeting twice and organised our church weekend away and led the programme. I’ve also led and preached at Sunday services.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
The most important thing I’m learning is how to preach God’s Word faithfully. It’s been a privilege and a highlight to be given opportunities to preach, and I’m grateful to the many people who offer me helpful feedback. I already feel that my preaching has improved greatly through the combination of Cornhill and honest feedback from those who care and want to see me grow.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
My minister, David Court, is currently on sabbatical so in the meantime Ali Sewell from Haddington Community Church is mentoring me. Ali has a real gift in preaching God’s Word and pastoring God’s people and it’s a real blessing to have the opportunity to be mentored by him. He did Cornhill a number of years ago so as well as being able to offer help and advice in regards to church-related things he can also do the same in regards to my time at Cornhill.

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
After my apprenticeship I’m very open to whatever I feel God calls me to. At the moment I feel as though I will go to ETS to study Theology but if I feel God closes that door and opens a different one I’ll be happy to walk through it.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like James, you can find all the information here.

 

 

 

 

Adam McNinch

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from Adam McNinch. Adam recently finished a 3-year Minister in Training programme at Charlotte Baptist Chapel in Edinburgh and he is now a Church Planter in Training at Charlotte. He’s working on planting a church in South Queensferry in 2020.

 

Adam McNinch

What led you into training for gospel ministry?
Three things.

(1) An inward conviction:  I say conviction rather than feeling because feelings come and go and, in any case, they’re not to be trusted (Jer. 17:9!) What I am talking about is a settled conviction that has grown over time and hasn’t gone away.

(2) The affirmation of others:  I fully believe that it is the church who sends (Acts 15:22) – so inward conviction alone isn’t enough.  It was very important for the members and elders of my church to decide whether this next step was right for me.

(3) Conducive Circumstances. I was encouraged to go to the FIEC’s first ever Hub Conference in 2012 and this was a useful event to attend as I considered vocational ministry. It still took a few years for things to come together. It wasn’t until 2016 that we decided it was the right time to start training. Edinburgh Theological Seminary was on my doorstep and allowed me to study theology without uprooting my family. The recent creation of the Pastor-in Training role at the Chapel allowed me to minister in the church I know and love to people who know and love me. 

 

What training had you done prior to your current role?
Between 2010 and 2012 I studied part-time at the Cornhill Training Course in Glasgow. I’ve also picked up various bits of training over the years through Moore College, 9Marks, CCEF, TNT Ministries and at Charlotte Chapel with Paul Rees, Liam Garvie, Tom Lawson, Peter Grainger, Colin Adams and others – taking advantage of any useful training I can find!

 

What does training look like day to day?
On top of getting ready for the church plant, I teach and preach at the Chapel, meet with people, and lead services.

It has been great to have Andy Paterson on the staff team at the Chapel. Andy joined us in September 2018 as a part-time Associate Pastor. He also serves part-time as the mission director of the FIEC. Andy has considerable experience and gifts to help me. He spent 24 years pastoring Kensington Baptist Church, a large inner-city church in an ethnically diverse area of Bristol. Whilst at Kensington, Andy was involved in four church plants, cross-cultural work and local community projects. Andy has already provided me with relevant books to read, highlighted training events to attend, and is a great guy to have in your corner as a church planter.

I’ve joined the Urban Planter Incubator Course hosted by Neil McMillan of The Free Church of Scotland. This is a 2-year programme working through Redeemer City to City’s Church Planting Intensive training materials. This involves guided reading, reflective questions, group discussions, peer mentoring, and support. There is also a monthly church planters’ gathering which I have attended.

I have arranged to spend time shadowing church planters of two recent plants as part of my development and I am to gain further experience like this with other church plants in the coming year.

In September I started CCEF’s Dynamics of Biblical Change course through their partnership with Biblical Counselling UK. Dynamics provides a theoretical and practical introduction to the biblical counselling approach developed by CCEF who have been setting the pace in biblical counselling for over 40 years.

These are the aspects of my training that have already started but I will also pay attention to other relevant opportunities as they crop up in 2020.

 

What have you learned over the course of your training? What have been the highlights?
It has been a highlight to learn from experienced pastors like Paul Rees, Liam Garvie, and Andy Paterson. It has been a joy to serve with a godly elder group who love our church in a sacrificial way. Studying at Edinburgh Theological Seminary has been a privilege – what a resource to have in the centre of Edinburgh! I also mustn’t forget the annual Bonar Preaching and Leadership Conferences that beneficiaries of the Bonar Trust get to attend. I’ve learned so much from Robin Sydserff and Paul Clarke as well as my peers who make up the group.

 

What do you hope to do when you’ve finished training? What stage are you at with these plans?
God willing, myself and a team of people from Charlotte Baptist Chapel will plant a new church in Queensferry in 2020.

A group of us already live in Queensferry and we’ve been enjoying meeting together to learn from the Bible over the past three years and praying for each other and for the community where we live.

Our vision is to see lives transformed in Queensferry through Jesus to the glory of God.

And our great desire is to be a church where we love God and love people; where we grow as we depend on God in prayer and learn together to obey his Word; where we bless our community and share the transforming good news about Jesus Christ.

 

What role has the Bonar Trust played in your training?
Without the financial support that the Bonar Trust provides, along with the support of my church and family, I wouldn’t be able to do what I’m doing at the stage and age I am.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Adam, you can find all the information here.

Robbie Laidlaw

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week Robbie Laidlaw shares his experience as a first-year Ministry Apprentice at St Silas Church, Glasgow.

Robbie Laidlaw

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
I was a Relay Worker with UCCF, based a Glasgow University Christian Union, and before that I studied Computer Science at Aberdeen University. 

 

What are you learning at Cornhill?
It’s great to be able to learn from such experienced lecturers, learning how to teach the Bible effectively. A real highlight has been working through Exodus and seeing how the book works together and good ways to preach through it and learn from it ourselves.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
I work alongside the teenagers and the students; I spend my weeks preparing study material for the groups for teenagers. This term we have been looking at Exodus and Acts. I also get to spend time meeting up with students and discipling them through reading the Bible together.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
One of the biggest things I’ve learned is what church ministry looks like – from the team dynamic of the staff to the responsibilities that come with being in a position of leadership in some form.
A real highlight for me has been working through Exodus with one of my one-to-ones. Being able to read through that and learn together what it means for us practically today, and also seeing his eyes open to how God reveals himself in this book has been wonderful. 

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
I meet with Martin, the rector, every two weeks to discuss workload and then to study Ephesians together. It’s a great chance to learn from him and his experiences here at St Silas. I’ve been learning what it looks like to develop and lead a Gospel-focused ministry. 

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I am unsure just now, but would like to explore further ministry opportunities, working with either students or teenagers. (or both!)

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Robbie, you can find all the information here.

Calum Cameron

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from Calum Cameron, a first-year Minister in Training at St Columba’s Free Church in Edinburgh.

Calum CameronWhat led you into training for gospel ministry?
Several years ago, through opportunities in my local church, I found that I had a strong desire to serve the Lord with the gifts he had given to me. I really loved preaching and handling God’s Word in a variety of settings. After some time of testing, praying and discussing, it became clear that the Lord could use me in full time pastoral ministry. I found clarity about this primarily in two ways: my own personal desire to do it, along with the wisdom, advice and recognition of my church leaders.

 

What training had you done prior to your current role, if any?
I’ve enjoyed a helpful combination of local church experience and theological training – both essential components of training for pastoral ministry!

I studied theology at undergraduate level for three years at Highland Theological College UHI, followed by another three years at Edinburgh Theological Seminary. During this time, I was a ministry apprentice in Ferintosh Free Church up in the Black Isle, then I was a ministry apprentice in Kilmallie Free Church over on the West Coast. In 2016 I became a ministry candidate for the Free Church of Scotland, and during my first three years in Edinburgh I worked in a training role at St Columba’s Free Church. In May 2019 I finished my bachelor’s degree, and in September I passed my final ministry exam and was licensed for ministry in the Free Church of Scotland.

 

What does training look like day to day?
In my role at St Columba’s I have opportunities to lead worship services and preach regularly, both through expository series (going through and unpacking a book in the Bible) and standalone sermons. I also have the privilege of leading small group Bible studies and one-to-one discipleship with young men. I’ve spent a lot of time working with our student group. Some of my time is spent on admin and various office tasks. I attend leadership meetings and regular training seminars. I also receive regular input, supervision, and feedback from my ministers and elders.

My master’s (at ETS) is mostly research, essays, and self-study throughout the year, but each term all the postgraduate students get together fortnightly for seminars where someone will present their thesis followed by a time of discussion. It’s so great to dig deeper in God’s Word together!

 

What have you learned over the course of your training? What have been the highlights?
One of the key things I have learned is how little I actually know! The further on I go in my training, the more I am humbled by the glory of God, the rich depths of his word, and the extravagance of his grace in using someone as weak and limited as me. It’s such a privilege to spend so much time in study, reflection, and prayer. I’ve learned a lot about myself and my own personal character, with all my flaws and faults – leading me to be even more intensely aware of my dependence on Jesus. I’ve learned so much about discipleship and the pastoral complexities involved in getting alongside people and their various problems and struggles. I’ve loved learning about the history of the church – there’s so much to learn from the people of God who have gone before us! I love biblical theology and seeing how God’s amazing plan of redemption can be traced from beginning to end. It’s hard to choose highlights because it’s all so exciting!

 

What do you hope to do when you’ve finished training? What stage are you at with these plans?
I am already licensed for ministry in the Free Church, so I will be considering various opportunities here over the next year and a half – there are so many avenues of service, including vacant congregations who need a minister, planting a new church somewhere, or taking up an assistant minister post in a more established congregation.

But ultimately, my hope is to help make Jesus known in Scotland. I think that sometimes the problem in Scotland is hostility and opposition. But it’s very easy to overstate that. I think for many people in Scotland today, the reason they don’t believe is ignorance and apathy. In other words, people just don’t know who Jesus is. As Paul put it, how can they believe in the one of whom they have not heard? My hope essentially is to tell people about Jesus, to proclaim his good news, and to help equip his people to love him and live for him in this world. I’d be thrilled if God can use me to help with that, even in a small way! The where and how is something I will be praying about over the next year and a half.

 

What role has the Bonar Trust played in your training?
The Bonar Trust generously supported me financially during 2015-16 while I was working full time as a ministry apprentice in Kilmallie Free Church. This opportunity absolutely would not have been possible without God’s amazing provision for me through the Bonar Trust, and I’m still incredibly grateful!

The Trust is also supporting me this year in my position as a Minister in Training – an amazing opportunity I would not have been able to experience without the kind generosity of the Bonar Trust.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Calum, you can find all the information here.

Struan Yarney

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we meet Struan Yarney, a first-year ministry apprentice at Trinity Church Aberdeen.

 

Struan Yarney

What did you do before your apprenticeship?
Before I started with Trinity, I worked with UCCF doing their mission and discipleship program called Relay at Robert Gordon University. Prior to my time with UCCF I studied history at the University of Aberdeen for four years.

 

What are you learning on your study programme?
I’ve been on the Cornhill course since September and am thoroughly enjoying my time there. It’s a real encouragement being in a class full of people who are there to submit to the authority of God’s word and are passionate about trying to teach and preach it faithfully across Scotland. Our classes are currently taking us through a Bible overview, a study of the book of Exodus, as well as instructions in preaching. The detailed study and unpacking of the book of Exodus has been a particular highlight so far.


What does ministry look like day to day?

As the cliché goes, no two weeks or even two days look the same in ministry with many varied tasks often popping up. However, the usual constants are helping lead student suppers (either doing a short talk or lead a bible study) and being part of staff meetings. Fortnightly, I meet with the minister and assistant minister for further study of something we’ve each read in the lead up to meeting. This has been a wonderful opportunity, not least to be able to pluck both of their brains about various ministry things! Other ministry opportunities include preaching, leading services, doing 1-to-1 Bible studies, and visiting older folks in the congregation.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
One of the things I’m learning is the importance of knowing people well in order to minister effectively to them. It seems like quite a simple thing, but more and more I’m learning how crucial it is if I’m going to serve my brothers and sisters well in encouraging them and when teaching them, whether that be in student suppers, 1-to-1’s or preaching. Particular highlights have been doing further theological studies with David (Minister) and Will (Assistant Minister) as well as continuing with student suppers and just seeing a growth in relationships and growth in love for God’s word together.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
David Gibson mentors me and I think he’s been key in helping me see the importance of knowing people well in order to minister to them. Alongside that we’ve spent some helpful time looking at Paul’s narrative of pastoral ministry and a book on ‘The Pastor as Minor Poet’ with Will.

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I’m not 100% certain on what I’d like to do post these two years with Trinity. I’m currently torn between going back to work with UCCF as a Staff Worker or going into some form of secular work.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Struan, you can find all the information here.

 

 

Lucy Thompson

Each week we’re introducing you to different people supported by the Bonar Trust. This week we hear from Lucy Thompson, a second-year apprentice at Chalmers Church, Edinburgh.

Lucy ThompsonWhat did you do before your apprenticeship?
I did Relay with UCCF in Stirling, and prior to that studied Geography in Dundee University.

 

What are you learning on your study programme?
I am studying at Cornhill and absolutely loving it! Currently thinking about the ‘shape of pastoral ministry’; what is it biblically speaking, where are our natural strengths and weaknesses, how can we grow and encourage one another in this area, how do men and women differ, how to minister to different age groups, etc. It’s proved to be an encouraging and valuable module.

 

What does ministry look like day to day?
A lot of the ministry I get to be involved in is with students. I co-lead a Bible study group of about 10 undergraduate girls. I meet up regularly with a couple of them to read the Bible 1-to-1, and check in semi-regularly with the others to see how they are doing in their walk with Jesus. I teach the 6 year olds weekly in the Sunday School, which has been a special joy to see their love for God grow, and how good they are at asking each other and me questions. I help out at Impact (youth club) every other week, my first time working with teenagers.

 

What’s the most important thing you are learning from the apprenticeship? What have been your highlights?
I’m increasingly seeing how rich God’s word is! The cliché is true of the more you know, the more you realise how much you don’t know. This has been made especially clear through group apprentice training sessions I think. The sessions help spur me on in reading God’s word, reminding me of the riches it contains, giving me glimpses of how as a Christian I can be captivated by God’s word for however long I live and always keep seeing something new and amazing about who God is, being reminded of something I had forgotten or misplaced, something new about what he has done, what he is doing and what he will do. That might all sound a bit abstract but the implications aren’t. It makes me hopeful when I do my daily Bible reading that God is speaking to me, and there is something he is saying that I can cling to or meditate on throughout the day. In turn it means I know how rich God’s word is to feed the people in Chalmers I minister to, allowing me to point them more clearly to Jesus. The sessions also help remind me of the crucial connection between learning about God and turning that into praise and worship and thankfulness.

 

What are you learning through mentoring?
Roger and Jessi Day mentor me (Assistant Minister at Chalmers and his wife). I’m learning so much from time with them, but what has struck me particularly over the past few months is how they have consistently not just tried to help me practically, but they’ve always pointed me to back to Christ and his love and sufficiency for me. By receiving that myself I hope I am learning how to do the same for others.

 

What would you like to do after your apprenticeship?
I’m still trying to figure this out, but longer term I would love to be and have been encouraged to be involved in ministry in a full time capacity, perhaps as a women’s worker in a local church.

 

If you would like to give to the work for the Bonar Trust and support more individuals like Lucy, you can find all the information here.